The Graphic (№ 2249)
Коллектив авторов01.01.1913

HURRICANE AS A CHRISTMAS BOX: THE STORM THAT SWEPT THE CHANNEL AND ITS RESULTS CAPTAIN YEO, OF THE DUCHESS OF CORNWALL PLYMOUTH: THE BRAZILIAN STEAMER GOYAZ ASHORE PORTLEVEN: THE ITALIAN STEPS NAPOLITANIA ON LOOE BAR PLYMOUTH: THE WILLIAM GILMOUR ON THE ROCKS CAPTAIN BIDWELL, OF THE NARRUNG


THE NARRUNG: THE DAMAGED FORE PART
THE NARRUNG: ANOTHER VIEW OF THE SIDE
THE P. AND O. NARRUNG: THE WRECKED SIDE THE NARRUNG: EXAMINING THE DAMAGE
SOUTHSEA: THE HUGE SEAS BREAKING OVER
The terrible storm which swept over the country in Christmas week reached its height on Boxing Day, when the force of the gale in the Channel reached eighty-eight miles hour. At Plymouth four vessels were at one time on the rocks, including the lifeboat which had gone to the assistance of the others, and the British steamer Duchess Cornwall arrived at Falmouth with her funnel carried away, all her boats smashed, and two men missing. The most sensational incident was the return to London of P. and O. liner Narrung four days after sailing with 248 emigrants for Australia. In the Bay of Biscay she encountered a terrible storm, and after steaming against i
some hours, a huge wave, estimated to be seventy feet high, swept the ship and nearly swamped her, tearing up the iron deck, carrying away the winches, and Hooding the passengers quarters forward. The doors of all the cabins on one side of the Narrung were smashed in, and hardly a dry bunk was left in the ship. Captain Bidwell, the commanding officer, decided eventually to turn the ship round—a delicate operation which occupied nearly an hour and a half—and to put back to port. The storm continued for two days, and during all that time forty women were imprisoned without food in the bow of the ship. Captain Bidwell remained on the bridge for fifty hours without food or rest.
AND DEMOLISHING THE CONCRETE DEFENCE WALLS